Wednesday, October 30, 2019

Susan Power's Scared Wilderness Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1500 words

Susan Power's Scared Wilderness - Essay Example Different backgrounds and eras gave them an idea to restore foundation to fulfill the dream of American women. The novel is taking us through the time, when the Mohawk were living on the territory of present-day Minnesota. The fourth novel by Susan Power is taking up to the centre cultural and spiritual traditions. We are getting cognizance with four women: Gladys Swan is enjoying the mansions on St. Paul’s Avenue. She is a housekeeper in the house of Candace Jenssen, who is well-to-do lady. She has all necessary material goods, she does not suffers from poverty, in spite of this she has a lack of spirit, being in disconnection with her husband and the sources and heritage of her Mohawk culture. Gladys, being as the elder of an Ojibwe, is thinking about putting Candace in touch with her ancestors as her private mission. However, Candace does not know about this idea. Beautiful Maryam is her co-conspirator in this unusual task. Candace dismisses appeals of Maryam, thinking about her as a hallucination caused by a brain tumor. Maryam changes the strategy, appealing to Gladys, who is very glad to meet â€Å"a sister†, who would join to her work and share her desire to help Candace. The author is trying to show is the images of the prehistoric biblical times, giving the readers an interesting re-imagining of first meetings of Native Americans with the missionaries of the Christian religion. She makes the reader to look from another fresh point of view to the lives Mary, Joseph and Jesus. Al this is happening in addition to the Power`s contemporary line of story, returning to the traditions of ancient cultures, which the imaginative time-traveler would be able to found in the early 17th century on the territory belonging to the Mohawk people, when man were hunting the food and female Mohawks looked after the gardens and collected vegetables to feed the tribes. â€Å"Do you really want to be reduced to some kind of throwback stereotype from the Dark Ages?

Monday, October 28, 2019

Difference Between Single & Married People Essay Example for Free

Difference Between Single Married People Essay Today, there are a lot of significant numbers of people who are married and some are single. This has changed their lives and gives differences between their lives. In this essay, I am going to compare and contrast the differences between single people’s lives and married people’s lives in their lifestyle, companionship, and responsibility. Some things in life are going to be good, regardless of whether you are single or married, and some things will be the opposite. There are advantages and disadvantages to both. The two areas that differ in married and single life are compromise and sharing of possessions. Lifestyle is the first difference between single and married people’s lives. Single people have much more privacy in their life. They are not bothered by anybody in their home. Nobody will demand that they sleep late, not watch movies too much and so on. And, single people can live a free life too. They can spend their time with their friends anywhere and anytime they want. In contrast, married people are bothered by their partner. They have to take care of their children and their partner. They cannot live a free life. If they want to go out with their friends, they must get permission from their partner first before they go. Married people are busier compared to single people, because married people have to take care of their children and their partner, unlike single people who do not have children and partner. Companionship is the next difference between single and married people’s lives. A husband depends on his wife, and a wife depends on her husband. Support is easily achieved from their partners, parents and their children, unlike single people who do not depend on anybody in this world. They cannot trust anyone to share their secrets and other important parts of their life except their parents. Support can be achieved only from their parents and their friends. Read more:Â  Married vs Single Responsibility is the last difference between single and married people’s lives. Married people have to manage their money and expenses gently and economically every day. They are also responsible for raising their children and guiding their families. If they cannot guide their family in the right way, their family can be broken and maybe ruined their lives. Married people are also responsible for managing their time. They have to spend their time with their children, husband or wife every day. In contrast, people who remain single do not have a schedule, they do not have any children or partners to guide and they are less responsible with their money and daily expenses. In conclusion, lifestyle, companionship, and responsibility are the three main differences between single people and married people’s lives. So is single life comfort and married life pleasure? Some people prefer to be single, others prefer marriage. Although there are reasonable advantages to both lifestyles, both lifestyles can be equally rewarding.

Saturday, October 26, 2019

Freedom of Speech in Cyberspace -- Internet Web Cyberspace Essays

Freedom of Speech in Cyberspace Since the public has logged onto the internet there has been vast amounts of information available. Since the 1990s more and more countries have entered into the information age. Due to the lack of freedom of speech in several countries, censorship has now taken on a prevalent role in the suppression of information. Many countries view a great deal of information as a threat if put into the wrong hands and as a consequence attempt to reduce its availability. However, unlike many of its other counterparts, the United States takes a very liberal stance towards the access if information on the Internet, which is protected by the First Amendament. In contrast to this philosophy, the Saudi Arabian government, in an act to suppress and censor the prevalence of the information on the internet, has established laws and regulations that prohibit public access to the internet for religious and social reasons. The United States has had internet access for over a decade now and information and usage has flourished. The technology development over the last five years has promoted internet access across the country with internet access in homes and businesses increasing exponentially. With any ISP a person decides to use there is no censorship or filtration system which limits their access to any part of the internet. ISPs and multiple companies’ offer software which helps restrict children’s access to pornographic sites or sites that parents deem harmful to their children, but the companies to explicitly filter the content that is received at a personal computer. There have been laws that have been revoked by the Supreme Court or regional courts which have tried to regulate or filter Internet access[i... ...4/22/2004) [iv] McCarthy, Martha. (2003). Internet Censorship: United States v. American Library Association. (4/22/2004) [v] Committee to Protect Journalists. (2003) Attacks on the Press 2003: Mideast (4/22/2004) [vi] Human Rights Watch. (1999) The Internet In the Mideast And North Africa – Country Profiles-Saudi Arabia (4/22/2004) [vii] Zittrain, Jonathan and Edelman, Benjamin. (2002) . Documentation of Internet Filtering in Saudi Arabia. (4/22/2004) [viii] Human Rights Watch. (1999) The Internet In the Mideast And North Africa – Country Profiles-Saudi Arabia (4/22/2004) [ix] Committee to Protect Journalists. (2003) Attacks on the Press 2003: Mideast (4/22/2004) [x] Committee to Protect Journalists. (2003) Attacks on the Press 2003: Mideast (4/22/2004) [xi] Jehl, Douglas. (1999). The Internet’s ‘Open Sesame’ Is Answered Warily. (4/22/2004)

Thursday, October 24, 2019

Microbiology Lab Report

Page I – Cover sheet In the middle f the page give name and number of your microorganism In the right lower corner provide – your name – Lab section number (Biol 108-005) – Date submitted ( 4/18/2013) – the unknown tube # is 5 Page II table of result – This page will have your table of results include the following information – Name of the test – Medium used – Indicator used – your results Part III – All the test done As many pages as needed to do a complete job. n this section you are describing in detail all the tests that was done( all of the chemistry and biochemical reactions) – color change that indicates negative results with explanation which means the substrate, enzyme, products, media, indicator and negative and positive result – the enzyme that are needed for the reaction to take place – indicate what role of medium in the reaction is -what reagent is needed to identify the f inal product Part IV – discussion of Results -as many pages as needed to do a complete job this is the most important part of the report. Read com/chapter-8-microbial-genetics/">Chapter 8 Microbial Genetics Discuss in a logical and step by step how you concluded that you had a certain microorganism. If you had gram negative organism you need to explain which organisms were part of the study and how you eliminated three of them. – To convince your reader you need phrases like; – This negative result† suggested † that my organism is Proteus Vulgaris – this negative result â€Å"confirmed or Reaffirmed† that the organism is Proteus Vulgaris Part V (one page) significance of your particular organism: – Pathogenic, resident flora, or opportunist organism – Disease caused -Symptoms – Treatment – Other related information NOTE: Science writing is brief, concise and down to the point. Avoid long introductions and sentences this paper is due on the 18th which mean tomorrow at 7 am Thank you Please remember to separate each part separately also she accepts this formula too like: tryptophase Tryptoph———— 212;———— Indole Enzyme

Wednesday, October 23, 2019

Compare and contrast the poems by Wilfred Owen and Rupert Brooke

The scale of World War one was enormous resulting in 8556315 deaths across the whole world. It was the largest war in history. The conditions in the trenches was horrific, as all men had lice, were vulnerable to frequent gas attacks and could easily catch diseases such as, trench foot and gangrene. Rats infested the trenches, the men where covered in mud and they didn't have time to regularly wash. The men smoked to relax at night. It's not surprising that the life expectancy of a soldier in the trenches was Wilfred Owen was born on the 18th March 1893 in Owestry, Shropshire. He was educated at the Birkenhead institute and at Shrewsbury Technical School. Owens jobs consist of a lay assistant to the vicar of Dunsden and a pupil teacher. Prior to the outbreak of World War one he worked as a private tutor teaching English. In October 1915 he enlisted in the artists rifles where he trained for seven months. In January 1917 he was commissioned as a second lieutenant with the Manchester regiment. Owen began the war as a optimistic and cheerful man, but soon changed after many traumatic experiences. Owen was diagnosed with shellshock, it was when recovering in Craiglockhart hospital, Owen met Siegfried Sassoon. During a period in Scotland Owen wrote many of his poems. Owen died on November 4th 1918 at the age of twenty-five. In contrast Rupert Brooke, another famous War poet. He was best known for his idealistic, patriotic poetry during World War one, however Brooke never did experience first hand combat. Brooke was born in Rugby on the 3rd August 1887. Brooke was educated at Rugby School, Kings College and university of Cambridge. In 1913 Brooke suffered an emotional breakdown, believed to be because of jealousy and sexual confusion. Brooke was commissioned in the royal navy volunteer division as a sub lieutenant. Brooke developed sepsis from a mosquito bite, whilst travelling with the British Mediterranean Expeditionary force. He died on April 23rd 1915 off the island of Lemnos. â€Å"Dulce et Decorum Est† is a poem by Wilfred Owen, which is said to be his most famous. The poem explains many ideas of war. The poem is about a small group of soldiers limping back from the front line. They're in a bad condition from the fighting they have endured and are in need of some respite. As they return they are attacked by a gas attack. The soldiers struggle in the chaos but successfully put on the gas marks. However in the struggle on man fails and is left behind. The poem tells how Owen becomes haunted by the image of the painful death of the man. The thought never left his mind. The poem gives the reader a full insight into the horror of the war. Another one of Wilfred Owens poems is â€Å"Disabled.† It shows the neglection of soldiers who have come back from war. The poem tells a story of a young man who was good looking and loved the glory on a football pitch. He decided to sign up for the war. His reasons? He got told he would look a God in uniform, to impress his girlfriend and he loved the idea of glory. However, in the war he lost his limbs. On his return to the country he did not get his hero welcome, but instead he was neglected. Even the nurses looking after him avoided him. On the other hand â€Å"The soldier,† one of Rupert Brooke's most famous poems, tries to depict the glory of the war. In contrast to Owens more realistic views of war, Brooke's is far more, noble and glorified. His attitude was to reassure the British and hide them form the actual truth. The poem â€Å"Dulce et Decorum est,† uses similes such as â€Å"bent double like beggars under sacks† this brings the image of the soldiers looking like beggars and almost being crippled under the weight of their bags. Owen uses alliteration throughout the poem, â€Å"knock – kneed.† The use of alliteration describes effectively and quickly the conditions of the soldiers, letting the reader create the image in their mind. The line â€Å"haunting flares,† is one of many powerful descriptions Owen uses. It describes the picture of shells exploding behind the men but having an almost ghostly effect on them. Into the poem Owen uses effective punctuation such as â€Å"Gas! Gas! Quick boys!† This line quickly increases the tempo of the poem and the seriousness. The use of one syllable words with an exclamation mark also makes you experience the adrenaline rush the soldiers would of experienced. AS the tempo of the poem is increased so too is the urgency, this can been seen with words used such as, â€Å"floundering,† â€Å"drowning,† â€Å"fumbling,† and â€Å"stumbling.† Because the words are ending in â€Å"ing† it adds to the sense of urgency and speeds up the poem. Owen likes to involve the reader into his poems, he does this by the use of word â€Å"you.† As Owens views are against patriotism and the glory of battle he involves the reader to show just how bad and horrific the war was, and to experience the pain and death surrounding you like a shell. â€Å"Disabled† by Wilfred Owen also involves the reader and attaches the reader emotionally to the soldier. The first stanza begins with, â€Å"he sat in a wheel chair waiting for dark, and shivered in his ghastly suit o f grey.† This quotation shows a soldier who is disabled but also by the phrase, â€Å"waiting for dark† shows the loneliness of the man and can be seen as he is being forced to stay in his lonely state. The poem fluctuates between present and past and it is clearly seen in the poem the man's present life is dull and depressing, this can be seen with the line â€Å"voices of boys rang saddening like a hymn, voices of play and pleasure after day.† The voices remind him of his lost youth and how the world carries on oblivious to his condition. In the second stanza, Owen goes into the man's past and expresses the liveliness of his old life. The line â€Å"now he will never feel again how slim girls' waists are,† shows he has lost the ability to be a normal man and is tormented by girls' affection. This can be seen clearer in the line † touch him like some queer disease,† this shows the feeling of rejection and torment and how they are now repulsed by him. In the first stanza it is stated he has lost his legs, â€Å"Legless† but the phrase â€Å"before he threw away his knees, â€Å"shows he is held responsible for the loss of his legs and almost mocks him for his carelessness. Before he signed up for the war he felt proud to sustain an injury while playing football, â€Å"one time he liked a blood-smear down his leg.† He loved the glory on a football pitch and celebrated like a hero for a small wound. After one of the football matches the man got drunk, â€Å"drunk as a peg† and decided to sign up for the war. The man's reasons for signing up for the war were, â€Å"someone said he'd look a God in kilts.† The use of the word â€Å"someone† shows that the man was easily persuaded to join the army and by someone of no importance to him. Also he signed up to show his masculinity to impress the ladies and his girlfriend. However his career in the army was short lived and he was â€Å"drafted out.† â€Å"Some cheered him home,† this line shows the man did not get all the praise and glory he signed up for especially after sacrificing his life, and ironically the cheers was bigger for him on a football pitch. This shows Owens strong thoughts against glory and patriotism that a man who sacrificed his life is not shown the praise he deserves and the lack of care for the man after the war. The poem ends with a question to the readers, â€Å"why don't they come?† This question shows the man is desperate for care and need of attention, and is shouting out for the help of the nurses, however it could be seen as the man is waiting for something maybe his death to end his suffering. Rupert Brooke's â€Å"The Soldier† has a completely different view to Wilfred Owens poems. Although both poets deal with the issue of war, Brooke's poems are different from Owens because Brooke believes it is brave, fitting and courageous to die for your country. The poem starts with an arrogant statement â€Å"If I should die only think this of me.† This statement seems to be directed to someone close to him. It is also written in the conditional tense as if he believes he will not die. In the next line Brooke's use of alliteration is shown with â€Å"foreign fields.† This emphasises the word foreign, stressing Brookes feeling of patriotism even if you were to die in a foreign country. In the third line Brooke the word England is introduced for the first time which is somewhat strange because of the patriotism views of Brooke. The word England is then repeated several times in the poem, reinforcing Brooke's intense love of his homeland. In the poem Brooke uses enjambment which gives the poem its measured, calm feel. Repetition is also used to influence the feeling of pride and glory. In the line â€Å"her flowers do love,† Brooke refers to nature as a calming contrast to the war that is taking place. Brooke uses personification when he refers to England as a person, â€Å"her sights her sounds dream happy as her day.† Brooke uses this personification as a way of saying fighting for your country is like repaying all the things England has done for you. The structure of â€Å"Dulce et Decorum est,† is very intreseting as throughout the poem the speed and intensity of the poem is forever changing. â€Å"Gas! Gas! Quick, boys!† This use of monosyllabic words quickens up the poem and the usage of the exclamation marks higher the intensity. The poem opens with â€Å"Bent double, like old beggars under sacks, Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge, Till on the haunting flares we turned our backs And towards our distant rest began to trudge.† The heavy use of commas in the opening paints a picture of organised group of soldiers marching back from the front line. The rhyming scheme emphasises the sense of marching by using words such as, â€Å"sludge, trudge,† â€Å"boots, hoots,† and â€Å"blind, behind.† Also the rhyming scheme alternates in groups four. The poem â€Å"Disabled,† has a very unique structure as it includes some of your senses, touch, sound, sight and smell.†Voices of boys rang saddening like a hymn.† The use of your senses helps the readers paint a clearer picture of how the man feels and is treated. Also as the poem changes between ten tenses the rhyming scheme is disguised. Rupert Brooke's poem â€Å"The Soldier† is a measured sonnet which has a break of eight and six. The use of the sonnet gives the poem its calm, controlled, measured and reassuring feel. Brooke use of heavy enjambment disguises the rhyming scheme which can be seen as there is no rhythm to the poem. However as the poem is a sonnet it clearly gets Brooke patriotic views across. In conclusion I found the total contrast between the poets very interesting and can clearly understand the message the poems give. I find Wilfred Owens poems more engaging tho because of the true realistic tales he tells.

Tuesday, October 22, 2019

Free Essays on Edgar A. Poe’s Fear of Self

Edgar Allan Poe was a unique man that most people could not understand. Many recognize that he is a talented writer with a very strange and dark style. One of his most well known short stories is â€Å"The Fall Of The House Of Usher.† Many argue the different meanings of this story and how it is symbolic to his life. Poe was a very confused individual who needed to express him self, he accomplished this through the short story of â€Å"The Fall Of The House Of Usher.† Through this story, Edgar was trying to show the fear he had for him self, he did not understand him self so therefore Poe ran from his own personality and mind. This story enables the reader to take a look at Poe’s mind and reveals some of the details that led him into his own insanity. Almost everyone goes through different fazes in their lives where they are trying to find their true self. Some may be happy and content with who they are where as others are scarred and frightened at the human beings they have become. Edgar finally came to a point in his life where he needed to step back and examine himself. The method that he chose was to look into the depths of his own mind. There are many things for which he needed to come to terms with, in a sense he had grown apart from himself and needed to find out who he really was. The story of â€Å"The Fall Of The House Of Usher† is the story of Edgar Allan Poe taking a journey into his own mind in search of who he had become. Upon reaching the house of Usher he has come to the outer shell of his own mind, it is not clear what is wrong but Poe is certain that there is something off set and out of place. He cannot quite put his finger on it but it is there never the less. â€Å"What was it-I paused to think-what was it that so unnerved me in the contemplation of the House of Usher† (234). Before Poe truly finds what he is looking for, he knows that there is something wrong within himself. Even the setting of this story describes... Free Essays on Edgar A. Poe’s Fear of Self Free Essays on Edgar A. Poe’s Fear of Self Edgar Allan Poe was a unique man that most people could not understand. Many recognize that he is a talented writer with a very strange and dark style. One of his most well known short stories is â€Å"The Fall Of The House Of Usher.† Many argue the different meanings of this story and how it is symbolic to his life. Poe was a very confused individual who needed to express him self, he accomplished this through the short story of â€Å"The Fall Of The House Of Usher.† Through this story, Edgar was trying to show the fear he had for him self, he did not understand him self so therefore Poe ran from his own personality and mind. This story enables the reader to take a look at Poe’s mind and reveals some of the details that led him into his own insanity. Almost everyone goes through different fazes in their lives where they are trying to find their true self. Some may be happy and content with who they are where as others are scarred and frightened at the human beings they have become. Edgar finally came to a point in his life where he needed to step back and examine himself. The method that he chose was to look into the depths of his own mind. There are many things for which he needed to come to terms with, in a sense he had grown apart from himself and needed to find out who he really was. The story of â€Å"The Fall Of The House Of Usher† is the story of Edgar Allan Poe taking a journey into his own mind in search of who he had become. Upon reaching the house of Usher he has come to the outer shell of his own mind, it is not clear what is wrong but Poe is certain that there is something off set and out of place. He cannot quite put his finger on it but it is there never the less. â€Å"What was it-I paused to think-what was it that so unnerved me in the contemplation of the House of Usher† (234). Before Poe truly finds what he is looking for, he knows that there is something wrong within himself. Even the setting of this story describes...

Monday, October 21, 2019

Steve Wozniak Essays - Steve Jobs, Apple II Family, Free Essays

Steve Wozniak Essays - Steve Jobs, Apple II Family, Free Essays Steve Wozniak At first I had began brainstorming trying to think of a subject for this paper. I had heard Mr. Perry speak of Apple computer and of Steve jobs. His rise to power and his fall from grace then his rebirth, like the phoenix from in myths and legends rising from his own ashes. However I didnt know much about the subject. So I decided on the subject of Apple computers. Then the more I researched I found a more interesting subject. In the next few pages I am going to attempt to do justice of the accomplishments of Steve Wozniak. No not the other Steve, I found Steve Wozniak a more interesting person simply because I had never heard of the man. I never new he existed. Being of lesser knowledge than most on the subject of computers I found it fascinating. The way Steve Wozniak did things. Steve Wozniak was born in 1950. A baby boomer he grew up in suburban Santa Clara Valley, California with his parents and siblings. His father was an engineer for Lockheed and his mother was the president of a Republican Womens Club. He was into electronics heavily even as a child and young teenager. While looking at a magazine article he spotted a diagram for a simple calculator called the One-Bit-Adder-Subtractor. Woz, as his friends called him, dissected the plans and made improvements. In Cupertino Science Fair he took home first prize with the Ten Bit Parallel Adder Subtractor. It was his first attempt at building a computer. This would be the beginning of a great learning era it would seem. In junior high he had already taught himself how to design programs in computer languages. At homestead high school he absorbed everything he could about electronics and physics. He fare outreached his counter parts in class. After he graduated he went on to the University of Colorado but flunked out. You see he was bored with school because he was so intelligent. At least that is what he tells everyone. Returning to California the Woz still was interested in computers even after his fall from college life. One of his early interests was the Altair 8800. It was costly when it came out so he and a friend began research on it. In the garage of a neighbor Steve Wozniak created what would be called the cream soda computer. Named that after all the cream soda he drank while building it. While building it he met a man named Steve Jobs. Although the computer went up in smoke during a test the basic groundwork was laid for a machine that would change the world was set and a friendship that would turn into a new industry. After the introduction of the Altair an organization sprang up of hobbyist and amateurs. It was the Homebrew Computer Club and of course Steve Wozniak went to the meetings and rarely if ever missed one of them. It seemed the Altair used a costly microprocessor, the Intel 8080, to do its thinking. Since Woz couldnt afford the 179 dollars per chip he jumped at the offer Hewlett Packard offered its employees. At a substantial discount he could buy the Motorola 6800 microprocessor. He did experiments with it and like all computer parts the prices dropped. Then he moved on to the 6502 Microprocessor by MOS Technologies. The MOS chip sold for only 25 dollars this appealed to Woz because of the price per function. Plus he thought all this computer stuff could be done on very few chips and parts making it appealing to the everyday person. On April fools day in 1976 three men signed an agreement to form a computer company. After a little haggling a name was chosen for both the company and the computer. On 1300 dollars, which came from the selling of a VW van and a programmable calculator the three men would start an industry. They would call it Apple Computer and the first product would be called the Apple I. The three would soon become two you see Ron Wayne would sell out for only 800 dollars never getting the ten- percent of the millions to come. Surely he spent several

Sunday, October 20, 2019

The English Lexicon Will Always Be Back-Formated

The English Lexicon Will Always Be Back-Formated The English Lexicon Will Always Be Back-Formated The English Lexicon Will Always Be Back-Formated By Mark Nichol Back-formation, the development of a new form of a word by subtracting an element from an existing word, often results in additions to our word-hoard that people deem grotesque, but many words we consider members in good standing of the English language- usually verbs- have been created this way. Derided terms of recent vintage frequently originate in business-speak: Conversate is inexplicably more complicated than the verb it supplants (converse); incentivize takes too long to speak or write, perhaps, so now we have incent; liaise awkwardly abridges the phrase â€Å"form a liaison†; protà ©gà © has inexplicably surrendered to mentee as the logical counterpart of mentor; and notate is derived from notation, because note somehow does not suffice. However, common- and quite acceptable- noun-to-verb back-formations starting with nearly every letter of the alphabet abound, including automate (automation), babysit (babysitter), curate (curator), diagnose (diagnosis), evaluate (evaluation), flouresce (fluorescence), gamble (gambler), hustle (hustler), injure (injury), jell (jelly), kidnap (kidnapper), legislate (legislator), manipulate (manipulation), nitpick (nit-picking), orientate (orientation), peddle (peddler), reminisce (reminiscence), swindle (swindler), televise (television), upholster (upholstery), and vaccinate (vaccination). Some less obviously produced yet patently useful back-formations include the verbs derived from nouns beg (beggar) and moonlight (from moonlighter, the slang term for one who works a second job). Back-formation of nouns from adjectives has produced diplomat (diplomatic), greed (greedy), haze (hazy), peeve (peevish), and suburb (suburban), while adjectival back-formations from nouns include complicit (complicity), decadent (decadence), and surreal (surrealism). Two noun-to-noun developments denoting individual specimens based on words for collective concepts are ideologue (ideology) and statistic (statistics); yet another, stave, is a redundant back-formation of staves, the plural of staff in the sense of â€Å"a long stick or strip of wood.† Unit, meanwhile, derives from unity. Cherry, pea, and tamale are back-formations based on linguistic ignorance of terms borrowed from another language or descended from a previous version of one (from, respectively, the French word cherise, the Middle English term pease, and tamales, the Spanish plural of tamal). Similar back-formations considered nonstandard (now and, one can hope, forever) include bicep (and tricep) and kudo, based on the erroneous assumption that the words biceps (and triceps) and kudos (the former from Latin and the latter from Greek) are plural. Back-formations fill a need- whether valid or merely perceived as valid- and though some of them may, thankfully, wither from neglect, others will acquire legitimacy over time, while still others will proliferate (that word is itself a back-formation) anew. Want to improve your English in five minutes a day? Get a subscription and start receiving our writing tips and exercises daily! Keep learning! Browse the Spelling category, check our popular posts, or choose a related post below:Bare or Bear With Me?The Parts of a WordList of Prefixes and Suffixes and their Meanings

Saturday, October 19, 2019

Business and Corporate Level Strategies for Honda Motors Company Assignment - 4

Business and Corporate Level Strategies for Honda Motors Company - Assignment Example This paper illustrates that Honda started looking for new markets outside of Japan only a few years after it was founded. The founder believed that the company should always maintain an international viewpoint, looking at the rest of the world as the potential market base and factory footprint. As such, Honda, unlike its competitors, looks to localize rather than globalizing. This means that it allows its subsidiaries all over the globe to function as autonomous companies that design and produce vehicles and motorcycles according to local conditions and consumer needs. Honda is not a top-down organization that is controlled by the headquarters. Honda combines engineering, design, and manufacturing in each large company in the countries with its subsidiaries whereas other companies tend to keep research and design close to home where they are managed by executives who do not understand local circumstances and preferences. Honda has embraced the idea of paradox as a means of promoting critical thinking and re-assessing common wisdom and to shape new responses to ingrained expectations. The company prides itself on a knowledge-rich organization and putting the demand on its workers at all levels to engage in strategic thinking which is crucial towards its success. Honda holds the daily meeting with the employees, Waigaya, as the meetings are referred as to where decisions either large or small are re-evaluated and re-assessed to find the best tactical solutions to challenges both present and imminent. Honda, unlike other companies, does not rely on using robots and alternative automation as a means of retaining productivity and minimizing costs. The company only engages robots in areas that are considered dangerous and unsafe for human beings. The presence of machines de-motivates the workers and therefore disengages their enthusiasm for the job. Innovation according to Honda also is reduced when robots and machines are engaged rather than human involvement. That level of technology is set to a limit that the machines can achieve as compared to human creativity that is not limited like that of the machines. This is a good enough reason to appreciate that the capability of the mind of humans supersedes that of the machines, especially in creativity and improvement.

Friday, October 18, 2019

Why do people want to work in Bloomberg Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 250 words

Why do people want to work in Bloomberg - Essay Example Firstly, as mentioned, due to the fact that Bloomberg is so diverse and represents so many different specializations, there are opportunities for a wide array of individuals that are interested in the many fields in which this firm covers. Rather than merely being a financial analyst’s tool, Bloomberg has a presence in fields as diverse as television and environmental sustainment. In short, Bloomberg has over 427 different publications, its television station reaches more than 310 million people, and the firm tracks over 1.1 million different indices on a daily basis (Bloomberg 1). In this way, it is easy to see how many diverse fields are covered by Bloomberg and how many different types of people with diverse backgrounds in finance, economics, business, investment, law, and an array of other majors. Similarly, as with many large multinational companies, the attraction of working for Bloomberg cannot always be discussed as a function of overall salary. Due to the name recognition and the power and strength that such a position holds with reference to a resume, many individuals are willing to sacrifice an even larger salary at a different firm in order to work for Bloomberg. Although this may seem short-sighted, this ias due to the fact that people often are of the opinion that such a resume builder will be worth it in terms of their overall long-term career

Emotional Labour Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 2500 words - 1

Emotional Labour - Essay Example In addition, they also use environmental context in regards to relationships and physical location to prompt emotion. On the other hand, men depend on the internal physiological changes to access how they feel and determine the appropriate emotion.  Emotional labour is the management of feelings by employees when providing organizations service and is required to display some set of emotions which are either verbal or nonverbal with the sole purpose of inducing specific feelings and responses to those whom the service is being rendered. Therefore, employees are expected to use their emotions to influence the emotional state of others (Glomb &Tews, 2004). This concept came about in 1983 by a sociologist by the name Arlie Hochschild who created the term ‘emotional labour’. She described the activities that employees do that are beyond mental or physical duties (Hochschild, 1983). This means employees showing a genuine concern for the needs of customers. This includes smi ling, shaking customers’ hands while greeting customers as well as making a positive eye contact while providing services to clients ( Jansz & Timmers, 2002).  Organizations should always place strategic importance on service orientation to both the external customers, workmates and internal clients as well (J.A & Feidman, 1996). When employees face clients when they are angry or when they are unpleasant, emotional labour can be challenging because it is difficult to hide emotions and continue to smile even when getting negative feedback.

Thursday, October 17, 2019

Ethics in Small Groups Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 250 words

Ethics in Small Groups - Essay Example Every member provided his best and worked hard to produce a quality assignment. In the spirit of collective ideas, every member worked hard on their specific parts of the presentation thus making work easier.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚   Group members extensively used technology including WhatsApp, emails, and phone calls to connect. The approach helped to save time and facilitated the progress updates. In addition, the group members met in the library and Alexander Hall.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚   I learned that teamwork and division of roles according to individuals’ strengths significantly improves output level. Besides, a team should help one another to enhance their skills. I also learned that that working with a small group is fun and easy. Small groups enjoy privileges of efficient communication, problem-solving, and natural decision-making. Fallen leaders and ethical deterioration Based on the theme of Fallen leaders and ethical deterioration, I gained significant insights about visionary and strategic leadership. I intend to utilize the knowledge to guide my future decision-making process to minimize failures caused by the unsound decision. Furthermore, the teachings shall help me to navigate through leadership platforms keeping in mind that integrity, sound judgment, and right public image are earned based on good leadership skills (Mendonca & Kanungo 2006).

In 1901 Maude and George became engaged and he presented her with a Essay

In 1901 Maude and George became engaged and he presented her with a single large stone diamond ring in a gold setting of a style popular at the time - Essay Example The various legislations related to the consumer law protect the rights of a person as a consumer, whether it is of dispute regarding the sale and purchase of the goods/services, or it is of dispute regarding the quality of the goods. As a consumer, a person's rights are expressed as a series of "guarantees" that a seller automatically makes to you when you buy any good or service ordinarily purchased for personal use.(1)Apart from these dimensions of the dispute , the consumer law protects the rights of those consumers who engage in the distance selling. The concept of distance selling includes the selling and buying of the goods/services through the phone. mail etc. An increasing range of goods and services are available to consumers1 shopping in these ways2. The Businesses that normally sell by distance means, the have systems in place for trading in this way.(DSR)(2) the concept of distance selling always includes those elements specified in consumer protection acts. Like any oth er consumer law provisions, it needs a consumer, business; contracts-it should be a distance contract, financial service, Supplier, Working days regarding the business. In given case, Sophie was given diamond ring by her aunt which was later modified by herself has been stolen by Lee, the burglar. Later on Sophie discovered this particular ring in Ebay from whom she came to know that the same has been kept for the exhibition by one Evan, who received this ring from his US based aunty .At present the ring is with the sandy who is the fianc of Evan. The issue in the problem is whether Sophie has to face any obstacles, if decided to recover the ring from Sandy and if so, what may be those obstacles. Before stumble on the barriers, first we shall look upon the possible claims which can be raised by Sophie to recover the ring under various provision of the law. Since the particular ring was examined by the experts before the resetting, Sophie has enough evidence to prove the ring is possessed by her through the witness's testimony. Moreover The photographs of the original pattern of ring has been taken .So the connection of original and modified rings can clearly be proved.(evi)(3) Moreover, Sophie can claim the possession of the ring on the basis of report of Birmingham Jewellery Quarter where she valued the ring as well as on the report of insurance company where the ring was insured. The company has already compensated her also. Apart from this, Lee the burgler already pleaded guilty about the stolen ring among other thing, even though he has given vague statement on this matter. The enquiries by the Ebay also showed that ring was owned by them originally, but a

Wednesday, October 16, 2019

Ethics in Small Groups Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 250 words

Ethics in Small Groups - Essay Example Every member provided his best and worked hard to produce a quality assignment. In the spirit of collective ideas, every member worked hard on their specific parts of the presentation thus making work easier.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚   Group members extensively used technology including WhatsApp, emails, and phone calls to connect. The approach helped to save time and facilitated the progress updates. In addition, the group members met in the library and Alexander Hall.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚   I learned that teamwork and division of roles according to individuals’ strengths significantly improves output level. Besides, a team should help one another to enhance their skills. I also learned that that working with a small group is fun and easy. Small groups enjoy privileges of efficient communication, problem-solving, and natural decision-making. Fallen leaders and ethical deterioration Based on the theme of Fallen leaders and ethical deterioration, I gained significant insights about visionary and strategic leadership. I intend to utilize the knowledge to guide my future decision-making process to minimize failures caused by the unsound decision. Furthermore, the teachings shall help me to navigate through leadership platforms keeping in mind that integrity, sound judgment, and right public image are earned based on good leadership skills (Mendonca & Kanungo 2006).

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Journal Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 500 words - 22

Journal - Essay Example These skills not only prove to be useful in one’s career but also in one’s daily life. For example, one of the skills you develop is delegating work to your subordinates. If you are the kind of person who wants everything perfect then this maybe a bit difficult because other people in your view can never perform that job in the same way that you can. But what delegation does is that it saves you a lot of time and that time can be spent on other more important things rather than paying too much attention on petty details. But this is not as simple as it sounds. Delegation simply does not work itself many a times especially in the context of student societies when the students are working for free without any monetary incentive. What this situation requires is a mix of charisma and knowledge of as to how to motivate your subordinates. Your personality should have strong communication skills and if you are delegating a difficult task to your subordinate then you need to ex plain to him what intrinsic value he can derive from that work when there is no apparent monetary benefit. These are some of the skills that you can always integrate in your office life and in your daily life. For instance the experience that I gained at university in the student society can easily be utilized in arranging a grand family reunion or a wedding in the family. There are many parts of my story which serve as a source of wisdom and knowledge for me in an optimistic way. For instance being the president of a student society means that you have to deal with the responsibility of the society as well as the pressure of your studies and maintaining your social life. This sometimes creates a lot of stress and time management issues. But when you look back at that time after a few years, you realize that the skills gained back then are proving to be mighty useful. Some

Monday, October 14, 2019

An Overview of the Twelve Tables Essay Example for Free

An Overview of the Twelve Tables Essay If anything, The Twelve Tables of the Roman Empire provide for the disposing of a common, stereotypical image of Roman society that it was a lawless, militaristic totalitarian state where the Emperor executed thousands of citizens with no care for the rule of law. While it is true that certain Emperors such as Caligula and Nero were hardly known for their excellent records for human rights, the reality is that Roman Society was a civilization that placed great emphasis on the legal structures and due process, albeit these laws also displayed a wanton cruelty designed to impose the Roman concept of order on the populace. Per Cicero, â€Å"Though all the world exclaim against me, I will say what I think: that single little book of the Twelve Tables, if anyone look to the fountains and sources of laws, seems to me, assuredly, to surpass the libraries of all the philosophers, both in weight of authority, and in plenitude of utility.† (Halsall) That is, the authority of The Twelve Tables is absolute. As an imperialist and occupying power, Rome was merciless. Its humanitarian goals were non-existent and it enslaved thousands. Domestically, Rome, while not as wanton, still remained harsh. While it did impose a series of harmless laws, usually centering on economic issues that provided a sense of order within the civilization, other rules were incredibly cruel. While there were statutes dealing with such benign issues as dealing with the paving of roads and civil litigation, there are a number of laws that also promote slavery, infanticide, torture, women’s subjugation and public executions, all of which promoted the state and the ruling class as the center of all moral authority. In comparison to the Code of Hannurabi and the Code of Assura, there is a great deal of â€Å"overlap† in terms of how an established, orderly system had been designed in order to establish property rights that extended to including women and subjugated slaves as property. In this regard, The Twelve Tables are highly derivative of these two codes as all three exist to impose the rule of a dominant, male ruling class where the state rules with an iron fist in order to maintain its control. Instead of an disorderly society where anarchy rules over all else, there is an established society with a code of laws, albeit unfair laws that can also wield the iron fist of cruelty where the moral relativism of the state is responsible for the brutality that it has sanctioned as legitimate. In regards to the Covenants found in Hebrew society, while there is present the subjugation of women and capital punishment of crimes, the ultimate moral authority is God.   â€Å"A covenant is more personal than a contract — it involves loyalty and allegiance, not just a financial exchange. God has made several agreements or covenants with humans. He gives commands and makes promises.† (Morrison) That is, the existing Covenants are between God and his people as opposed to the people and the state as evidenced in the other three societies. Furthermore, Hebrew laws derived an authority from God that eliminated the moral ambiguity that allowed for the more violent laws of the secular societies used to crush decent and control the population. This is not to say that Hebrew Society was free of injustice, but it did not co-opt the wanton cruelty that existed in the other civilizations. Roman society was not a society of disorganized laws that imposed cruelty. On the contrary, the cruelty imposed upon the populace in the Roman Empire were based on an orderly set of laws that while legal, were immoral, which begs that question as to whether or not the laws were ultimately legitimate. Works Cited Paul Halsall, 01 June 1998, Ancient History Sourcebook: The Twelve Tables 04 November 2006 URL http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/ancient/12tables.html Paul Halsall, 01 June 1998, Ancient History Sourcebook: The Code of the Assura, 04 November 2006 URL http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/ancient/1075assyriancode.html Michael Morrison, 1995, Covenants in the Bible, 04 November 2006 URL http://www.wcg.org/lit/law/covenants.htm

Sunday, October 13, 2019

Mental Health Service User Case Study

Mental Health Service User Case Study 1.1 Decision making by nurses is now firmly established in practice, policy and educational agendas. New constantly evolving, roles, and a policy context that is challenging traditional professional boundaries mean that, more than ever, nurses are being given autonomy and power to be able to exercise their decision choices (Thompson, 2001). 1.2 Clinical decision making may be defined as having a variety of options and choices and a process that nurses undertake during their everyday activities whilst caring for service users. It usually involves nurses making judgements about the care that they provide to service users (Thompson et al, 2002). Similarly ONeill et al (2005) argues that clinical decision making is a complex activity that requires nurses and other health professionals to be knowledgeable in relevant aspects of nursing, to have access to reliable sources of information and to work in a supportive environment. 1.3 Shared decision-making on the other hand is an interactive collaborative process that occurs between the nurse and the service user that is used to make health care decisions. Adams and Drake (2006) note that in shared decision-making the nurse becomes a consultant to the service user, helping to provide information, to discuss options, to clarify values and preferences and to support the service users autonomy (p.88). 1.4 Policy changes and trends in professional development within the last decade have reiterated the importance that nurses and other relevant health professionals need to recognise that the decisions they make have a direct impact on health care outcomes and service users experiences (DH, 2000). 1.5 Decisions can be easily examined in the form of decision trees which provide a highly effective structure within which many different options can be explored (Goetz, 2010). Goetz (2010) further argues that the decision tree encourages people to think through their options, to act consciously and with consideration. It has also been suggested by Corcoran (1986, cited in Bonner, 2001, p.350) that the decision tree is able to provide a clear structure which helps to assess a range of actions that health professionals may choose when making decisions regarding the care and treatment of a service user. 1.6 In contrast, Bonner (2001) argues that the decision tree is under researched within the scope of mental health practice. He does acknowledge that the use of the decision tree in practice allows nurses to examine the options available to them in more detail, whilst also considering the complex variables that influence the decision-making process. 1.7 It would be expected that the decision tree is hierarchically structured and spans a specific period of time which will be determined within the Justifications section of this report. 2. Methodology 2.1 The purpose of this report is to identify a service user with whom one was currently working with in practice. Using a decision tree, the service users journey will be detailed from their current health needs from the point of referral to mental health services to the current point in time. Once the decision tree is formed, it will then be essential to identify up to three critical decision points and analyse the decision making process for each decision chosen. 2.2 The information required to form the decision tree is to be gathered during a 60-minute unstructured interview with the service user, which can be thought of as a guided conversation. The reason that this type of methodology will be utilised is because unstructured interviews allow a particular focus on specific areas through asking open-ended questions but also allow for probes and follow-up questions to be used in order to effectively obtain more information to construct the decision tree as accurately as possible (Streubert Carpenter, 1999). 2.3 In order to ensure that the information gathered is accurate, it will be beneficial to form a lifeline with the service user, looking at major life events and decisions that have been made. This lifeline can be found in Appendix 1. 2.4 It will also be essential to explore the service users medical notes (with their consent) in order to gain a clearer idea of events that have occurred, the vital decision points and whether service user involvement was evident throughout. 2.5 The decision tree that was formed can be found in Appendix 2. 3. Justification 3.1 The service user that will provide the focus of this report will be referred to as Sarah (a false name in order to maintain confidentiality). 3.2 Sarah is a 43-year old lady who has a diagnosis of borderline personality disorder. She has had multiple admissions to psychiatric units including admissions under the Mental Health Act (See Appendix 3 for supporting information). 3.3 Sarah was chosen because it was felt that the she would be able to provide a good history and account of events that have occurred in her past in relation to the care and treatment that she has received. Sarah was also deemed to have capacity and was therefore suitable to take part within this piece of work. 3.4 The timescale that the decision tree covers will focus upon a 6-year history whereby Sarah began her first contact with adult acute mental health services. This will be explored up to the current point in time. 3.5 During the gathering of information, both primary and secondary sources were used. Primary sources refer to first-hand accounts of events that have occurred (i.e. interview with service user). In comparison, secondary sources refer to information that has already been documented from the past (i.e. medical/nursing notes). It was decided to use both sources as they would provide information richer in validity and ensure the reliability of the findings. 3.6 The report will cross the boundaries between in-patient care and community services within the North of England. The key decision points that have been chosen for analysis within this report were chosen because it was evident that some decisions had a certain degree of service user involvement in comparison with others whereby service user involvement did not seem to be present. This does however introduce a debate in regards to service user involvement because those decisions that did not involve Sarah and that were made on her behalf, can be argued were made in the best interests of the individual i.e. admission to hospital to ensure Sarahs safety and well-being. 3.7 Each of the decisions will now be individually analysed with a specific focus upon the decision itself, the issues that they may involve and the concepts that they may introduce. 4. Referred and taken onto caseload with a Community Mental Health Team following gate-keeping assessment (See Appendix 4) 4.1 Sarah was referred to her local community mental health team following a visit to her General Practitioner (GP) whom was worried about the self-harming thoughts that Sarah was currently experiencing. The General Practitioner was very concerned about Sarahs apparent deterioration in her mental health, therefore he felt that it was necessary to refer her to the community mental health team who would then be able to offer assessment and work from that point onwards. The GP discussed this with Sarah who did admit to being a little apprehensive beforehand however after a short period whereby she was able to reflect on her current circumstances, Sarah was agreeable to this. 4.2 Borg et al (2009) argues that service user involvement has a crucial significance especially for individuals that work within a community mental health setting as this involves accessing patients in their own homes (p.285). Sarah did feel that she had developed a good rapport with her community psychiatric nurse because Sarah was always offered choices in terms of her care and treatment and she felt actively involved in the decisions that were made. The therapeutic relationship that was developed between Sarah and her community psychiatric nurse also played a vital role in Sarahs care as Reynolds and Scott (2000) argue that it is through this therapeutic relationship that we can assess the needs of the patients that we work with and then plan future care to assist in their recovery. 4.3 An important consideration is the potential risk involved in maintaining Sarahs mental health in the community. This was clearly documented within Sarahs treatment plan with specific actions outlined and crisis contact numbers provided to both Sarah and her Husband. The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (2009) provides guidance on risk assessment in patients with a diagnosis of emotionally unstable personality disorder. It informs that the risk assessment should take place as part of a full assessment of the patients needs and this is exactly what occurred due to the high level of risk involved and potential self-harm of Sarah within the community. 4.4 The main influences behind the decision to make a referral to the local community mental health team was Sarahs safety and how able she was to maintain this. Also if the GP felt that Sarah required a hospital admission and there were no hospital beds available, then a referral to the community mental health team or crisis resolution would be necessary. This therefore would indicate that care and treatment is dependent upon what resources are available at that specific time. 4.5 In order to ensure that the correct decisions are made, the specific team must have an effective leadership style and a variety of skills amongst team members. The New Ways of Working practice implementation guide (DH, 2007) outlines how a team can effectively achieve their maximum potential. In order for this to be achieved, a number of measures must be addressed which include; Focusing upon skills and matching these to the needs of service users; Distributing responsibility fairly amongst the team rather than delegating; Focusing on ability and competence of team members rather than role. 4.6 The policy discussed in section 4.5 appears to be utilised well within this team because Sarah was allocated to a senior care coordinator that had a large amount of experience of working with individuals with a diagnosis of personality disorder. The health professional was also able to engage and was competent in carrying out Dialectical Behavioural Therapy with Sarah which is a specialised treatment suitable for those with a diagnosis of personality disorder (Comtois et al, 2007). 4.7 There are many alternate decisions that the General Practitioner could have made in order to ensure that Sarah received the treatment that she required to meet her needs. A referral to the local crisis resolution home treatment team could have been made who would offer assessment and then decide a plan of action. Brimblecombe (2001) argues that a team such as this could have the potential to reduce the number of hospital admissions, therefore utilising resources and funding more effectively but at a cheaper cost. 4.8 Another possible course of action could have been to make a referral to the acute community day services (day hospital) who would be able to provide care throughout the day for Sarah if she required support. This would be a less restrictive alternative than hospital admission and Sarah may be more likely to engage with this service based in the community. 4.9 Alternatively, the GP could have chose to not do anything except review Sarah after a few weeks to assess whether her mental health was still deteriorating however this may be seen as unethical especially if Sarah was suffering due to her experiences and self harming thoughts, which ideally should be resolved as soon as possible. 5. Voluntary (informal) admission to acute psychiatric hospital following presentation in Emergency Department (See Appendix 5) 5.1 When Sarah becomes acutely unwell, the most common course of action is to admit her to hospital for her own safety and well-being but also the safety of others. This particular hospital admission was informal which therefore indicates that Sarah was willing and agreed to go into hospital, having been assessed by a team which specialises in self-harming behaviour. 5.2 The Mental Health Act (2007) refers to informal patients as those that accept and agree to go to hospital without the use of compulsory powers. Sarah was not detained therefore she was permitted to have leave from the ward to spend at home with family. This was Sarahs choice and was discussed in collaboration with the Consultant Psychiatrist until an agreement was made. 5.3 The decisions to admit Sarah to hospital was made by a health professional that assessed Sarah in the Emergency Department following an incident of self-harm. Sarah did feel that she was fully involved within the decision because alternatives to hospital admission were discussed with Sarah however she felt that hospital admission was the most appropriate action to ensure her safety at that specific time. Furthermore the Nursing and Midwifery Council code states that as a professional, nurses are personally accountable for actions and omissions in their practice and must always be able to justify their decisions (NMC, 2008). 5.4 The main influences behind this decision were the levels of risk involved due to an escalation in Sarahs self harming behaviours within the community. The Ten Essential Shared Capabilities (DH, 2004) aimed to set out the shared capabilities that all staff working in mental health services should achieve. Promoting safety and positive risk taking is one of the major points within the document with the hope of empowering individuals to determine the level of risk that they are prepared to take with their health and safety. Ideally this includes working with the tension between promoting the individuals safety and positive risk taking which should be detailed within the individuals care plan. 5.5 Positive risk taking and risk management has been largely debated within the scope of mental health nursing. Parsons (2008) argues that people learn through a process known as trial and error. This therefore suggests that if Sarah self-harmed so significantly that her life was endangered then she would not carry out this behaviour again. This theory however can be largely critiqued in regards to Sarahs case because the self-harming behaviour is a regular occurrence with Sarah in full knowledge of the consequences that this may have. 5.6 A study carried out by Bowers et al (2005) examined the purpose of acute psychiatric hospital wards and they concluded that in most circumstances, patients are admitted because the possibility of harming themselves or others had increased significantly. They also found that when an individual is experiencing a severe mental illness whereby their behaviour is unmanageable in the community, this provides the requirements for a hospital admission. 5.7 In contrast, the quality of care on acute psychiatric hospital wards has largely been questioned in regards to the usefulness that hospital admission can actually have upon a person (Quirk Lelliott, 2004). In some circumstances, many individuals will receive high-quality care whilst in hospital however recent studies have suggested that for some individuals, the experience of hospital admission was rather negative (Baker, 2000; Glasby Lester 2005). 5.8 The Royal College of Nursing (2008) acknowledges that every nursing decision made has an ethical dimension and furthermore that ethics and ethical decision making abilities are applicable to every aspect of nursing practice. The decision to admit Sarah to an acute psychiatric hospital ward does introduce ethical dilemmas because it can be argued that it is unethical to admit a person to a locked ward and therefore restricting their freedom. 5.9 Beauchamp and Childress (2001) developed a framework which consists of four main principles. The first principle outlines the respect for an individuals autonomy i.e. respecting the decisions that they make and the reasons for making a particular decision. Sarah was given a choice in regards to hospital admission because she could have been detained under the Mental Health Act (2007) however she agreed to hospital admission and was therefore admitted as an informal patient. 5.10 The second principle is that of Beneficence which examines the benefits of having a particular treatment against the risks involved. This was discussed with Sarah and the reasons for hospital admission were fully explained which were to ensure Sarahs safety. Sarah understood the health professionals concerns and worries and did accept hospital admission therefore the health professional was acting upon beneficence. 5.11 The third principle is Non-Maleficence which refers to the avoidance of causing harm to an individual. It can be argued that any treatment can have to potential to cause harm however the benefits of the treatment must exceed this which in this case, the benefit plays much more of a vital role. 5.12 The final principle within the framework is Justice which examines the distribution of benefits, risks and costs equally. It therefore indicates that individuals should be treated fairly in similar circumstances and offered the same intervention/ treatment. In terms of hospital admission, the choice would be to go in as an informal patient or be detained under the Mental Health Act using compulsory powers. This decision would be given to most individuals however when capacity becomes a concern then detention may be required. 5.13 There are many alternate decisions to a psychiatric hospital admission which may have been decided. Sarah may have been referred to an acute community day service (day hospital) which offers assessment and treatment for working age adults that are experiencing acute mental health difficulties. A systematic review of randomised controlled trials of day hospitals within the United Kingdom, concluded that day hospital treatment is generally cheaper, the outcomes are greater and that there was greater satisfaction with treatment compared with in-patient care (Marshall et al, 2001). 5.14 Another alternative decision to hospital admission may be a referral to a crisis resolution home treatment team that would be able to provide 24-hour care. The Mental Health Policy Implementation Guide (DH, 2001) informs that the crisis resolution team is for adults between the ages of 16-65 with a severe mental illness or experiencing an acute crisis that without the involvement of a crisis resolution home treatment team, hospital admission would be necessary to ensure the safety of the individual. This however had been attempted in the past and Sarah did not feel that she benefitted greatly from the service because although they provide a 24-hour service, they cannot offer the same kind of interventions that a hospital ward could offer. 6. Diagnosed with Emotionally Unstable Personality Disorder (See Appendix 6) 6.1 Sarah was diagnosed with Emotionally Unstable Personality Disorder whilst an in-patient on an acute psychiatric ward. The decision to change Sarahs primary diagnosis of deep depression with psychotic episodes was made by the Consultant Psychiatrist that was involved in Sarahs care and treatment. 6.2 The National Institute of Mental Health (2001) describes emotionally unstable personality disorder as a serious mental health illness that is characterised by a pervasive instability in moods, interpersonal relationships, self-image and behaviour. The symptoms of emotionally unstable personality disorder are maladaptive behaviour learnt to make sense of the world and to manage the constant negative messages experienced (Eastwick Grant, 2005). It is important to note that Sarah did experience sexual and psychological abuse from an outsider of the family during her childhood which she did not disclose to her family until she was an adult. Sarah recognised that this was a major factor in the way that she perceived the world and was directly linked to her self-harming tendencies. 6.3 During this period of time, Sarahs behaviour became increasingly unsafe to manage in the community therefore warranting a hospital admission. Her self-harming tendencies had increased and there was a great concern for her safety mainly expressed by her family who were worried about Sarahs deterioration in her mental health. 6.4 When Sarah was given the diagnosis, she was unhappy due to the non-apparent involvement within the decision as she was not consulted in regards to the diagnosis or asked about her thoughts and feelings. Bray (2003) argues that decision making and service user involvement cannot always occur with individuals that have a diagnosis of emotionally unstable personality disorder due to the varying symptoms that they may experience i.e. impulsive behaviour which can diminish responsibility. 6.5 Once the diagnosis was made, Sarah felt that peoples opinions and attitudes had changed towards her including ward staff. According to Nehls (1999) individuals with a diagnosis of emotionally unstable personality disorder have described health professionals as being unhelpful, displaying negativity and generally being unhelpful. 6.6 A consultation document known as New Horizons (DH, 2009) outlines a cross Government vision in the hope of eradicating the stigma that surrounds mental health and improving the quality and accessibility of services, ensuring that services are service user friendly. The document stresses the importance of mental health and encourages individuals to understand that mental health problems should be equally as important as physical health conditions. 6.7 Services that are provided by the National Health Service (NHS) are commonly built upon effective partnerships between those providing care and those accessing care. The Department of Health (2004) informs that better healthcare outcomes are achieved when the partnership between health professional and service user is at its strongest. Within this particular decision, there was no partnership as Sarah was not involved in the decision making process in regards to her care and treatment and decision to make a diagnosis without consultation with Sarah. 6.8 An important consideration is that of power because the Consultant Psychiatrist that made the decision, created a position of power over the service user through expertise and knowledge. Pyne (1994) argues that knowledge is a form of power, therefore if we share this knowledge with the patients that we work alongside, then this can promote the process of empowerment in patients. The author then progresses to a stage whereby he questions why nurses do not always demonstrate this behaviour in practice. In comparison, McQueen (2000, cited in Henderson, 2002, p. 502) argues that power associated with special knowledge, that created a barrier between health professionals and patients is slowly diminishing. Furthermore, McQueen believes that both nurses and patients need to be seen as respected autonomous individuals with something to contribute towards an agreed goal. 6.9 There are alternate decisions that could have been undertaken rather than making a diagnosis of emotionally unstable personality disorder. The Consultant Psychiatrist may have decided to not make a formal diagnosis however this could therefore have an effect on Sarahs care and treatment as she would not receive the correct care and treatment to meet her needs. Sarahs previous diagnosis of deep depression with psychotic episodes may have remained the same however it cannot be determined how long this would have lasted due to the frequency of self-harming behaviours and multiple hospitals admissions due to an increased concern for Sarahs safety. 7. Comparisons 7.1 It has become evident that the three chosen decisions for analysis had common themes running through each decision. Power has become an important consideration because although Sarah had a degree of power within each decision, the overall decision was made by those within higher positions i.e. hospital managers and leaders. This can therefore provide the service user with a false misinterpretation of the power that they actually withhold as it is clear that the final decision is not made by the service user and instead it is those with more power i.e. the GP making the referral to the community mental health team and the Consultant Psychiatrist changing Sarahs diagnosis to emotionally unstable personality disorder without consulting Sarah beforehand. 7.2 Leadership has been defined many ways in the literature reviewed, however several features are common to most definitions of leadership and the forms that it can take. Faugier Woolnough (2002) argue that leadership is a process which usually involves a certain degree of influence, but also with a focus upon the attainment of goals .The leadership style mostly present within each of the key decisions is that of a democratic style because there was a degree of consultation with staff on proposed actions before an actual decision was made. 7.3 The care and treatment provided to Sarah was driven by resource availability and this was clearly evident within each decision. If resources are not available, this would impact on the decision whether to allow Sarah to have the treatment. The admission to an acute psychiatric hospital for example would be dependent upon the capacity of that specific organisation because if there was not a bed available for Sarah then other alternatives would have been considered. Fortunately there were resources available for Sarah, however the outcomes may have been different if this was not the case. 7.4 Sarah had also had a large amount of input from a number of services and there was a large amount of movement through mental health services. It can be argued that this is not beneficial towards service users as they are not able to sustain good therapeutic relationships with health professionals which can often be a reason as to why an individual may relapse. 8. Conclusion 8.1 Decision-making within practice takes place in many ways i.e. often the service user is consulted throughout their care and treatment however in some circumstances the service user can be made a recipient of their care and treatment which is not good practice. This report has identified a patient that one is currently working with and using a decision tree, their journey through mental health service was detailed. Three decisions were chosen for analysis and provided the basis of this report, considering factors that influence the decision-making process and also the alternatives that could have occurred. 8.2 Barker et al (2000) argues that the experience of being mentally unwell can be a disempowering period of time because choices can be taken away due to a number of reasons and the patient may feel a recipient of their care and treatment, rather than actively involved in the decision making process. 8.3 Defining decisions as good or bad is problematic, mainly because nurses operate in an environment that is characterised by uncertainty (Buckingham et al, 2000). Baron (2000) further suggests that the best decisions are those that produce the best outcomes for achieving a patients goals and wishes. 8.4 Sarah did feel the majority of time that she was involved in her care and treatment, including reviews and meetings held about her care and treatment whilst an in-patient and within the community. There were times however when Sarah did not feel involved in the decision making process i.e. when her diagnosis was changed without any consultation or discussion. 8.5 Clancy (2003) argues that there is a great tendency in decision-making to bypass a thorough analysis and jump too quickly into solutions. This seems to be evident at times within the chosen decisions for analysis because some decisions were made on behalf of Sarah and there was no consultation or service user involvement. 8.6 Throughout this report, the main aim was to analyse the decision-making process of three key decisions, taking into consideration concepts such as; autonomy, power, leadership and empowerment. It became apparent that they key to successful decision-making was to involve the service user and carers within the decision-making process, listening to their thoughts and opinions and respecting their right to choose between different alternatives. 8.7 It has also become apparent that those within higher positions and those that uphold a certain degree of power were leading the decision-making in Sarahs care. This is obviously not the way that things should work as the service user should be actively involved in all aspects of their care and treatment including decisions that are made. 8.8 Overall I feel that the whole process was an enjoyable one and I feel that I worked well in collaboration with the service user throughout. Collating the decision tree was a rather time-consuming activity, however I understand the importance that they hold and the benefits they possess. I have also become more aware and gained a greater understanding of how the decision-making process can impact on the lives of service user and carers, especially when service user involvement is not evident. 9. Recommendations 9.1 There should be a greater focus upon the decision-making process and how it can affect the service user. Decisions should be decided in collaboration with the service user to promote the nurse-patient relationship and allow good rapports to establish. Service user and carers should be actively involved in the decision making process. Decision making should be an identified topic for pre-registration nursing students to equip them with the desired skills. Decisions are to be based on the best available evidence and regularly discussed with users and carers ensuring that an understanding has been reached. Service users thoughts, feelings and opinions to be clearly documented to inform future nursing practice in regards to decision-making.

Saturday, October 12, 2019

Wallace Group Strategic analysis Essay -- essays research papers

The Wallace Group is a company that manufactures and develops technical products and systems. It has three primary operational groups consisting of electronics, plastics, and chemicals. By far the largest asset of the Group is the electronics. This asset is approximately the size of both the plastics and chemical groups of the corporation. It also contributes the most to the net income at approximately 70%. The plastics and chemical divisions were acquired for the purpose of diversifying the income of the corporation from the original electronics group.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  The Wallace Group currently faces some problems with it company in relation to improper management. To begin with, the company seems to have difficulty in the hiring process. It seems that the company is focused on cutting cost rather than looking for effective employment solutions. For example, instead of creating a management developing program to train and recruit managers, the company relies on promoting technical staff. The cost cutting approach is also impeding the hiring of qualified engineers. The company focuses on hiring employees at the least possible salary as an alternative to paying the required amount for qualified expertise. Another issue that arises is un-standardized methods of collecting data and presenting information. For example both the vice president of marketing and the director of advanced systems collect and utilize data for marketing purposes. Their problem lies in the fact that both managers are using different data and formats for ess entially the same purpose, and therefore they create redundancy and higher workloads. By far, the most crucial problem facing the group is the lack of vision and direction from the president, Mr. Wallace himself. His diversification program that resulted in the acquisition of the chemical and plastics divisions lacked forward looking vision. He simply required the companies to maintain a profitable operation without any direction to improve.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  In terms of priority, I would first recommend that the Wallace Group implement a corporate governance policy familiar to a business of its size. This would require that the company adopt a board of directors. A board of directors has five responsibilities: 1.  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Setting corporate strategy, overall direction, mission, or visio... ... management techniques from them. This is particularly solid approach since the methods employed have already been tested and the results can be predicted. The other theory I would use to educate Mr. Wallace is the organizational learning theory. It states that â€Å"†¦organizations adjust defensively to a changing environment and use knowledge offensively to improve the fit between the organization and its environment.† (Wheelen, pg8) To utilize this theory the company must respond to the changes to reduce negative impacts and position itself to take action. This allows for the company to essentially learn from its environment and lead to its own innovations in strategic management. References Wheelen T.L., Hunger J.D., Strategic Management and Business Policy Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ (2004) Bay Area Industrial Education Council, Employee turnover cost table retrieved Jun 10, 2005 http://www.baiec.org/Employee%20Turnover%20Costs.PDF#search='employee%20turnover%20costs' Information Week Issue 1041 Wal-Mart to Suppliers: Clean Up Your Data retrieved Jun 10, 2005 http://search.epnet.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=bsh&an=17226667&loginpage=Login.asp

Friday, October 11, 2019

Case study in marketing Essay

By the end of your reading, you should be able to answer the following questions: 1. What do you understand by the term Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR)? 2. Explain two actions that Amway and its IBOs are currently taking that involve CSR. 3. Analyse the key ingredients in Amway’s CSR strategy. Show how the strategy is designed to translate the vision into practical steps on the ground. 4. Recommend ways in which Amway could enhance and develop its impact on making every child matter. Introduction Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) means businesses and organisations working responsibly and contributing positively to the communities they operate in. It involves working with employees, their families, the local community and society at large to improve their quality of life. Companies that operate in a socially responsible way strengthen their reputations. In business, reputation is everything. It determines the extent to which customers want to buy from you, partners are willing to work with you and your standing in the community. The company  Amway is one of the world’s largest direct sales organisations with over 3 million Independent Business Owners (IBOs) in over 80 markets and territories worldwide. It is a family-owned business with a strong emphasis on family values. Its IBOs are often couples. Many of these are raising families. They therefore have a strong bond with children. These families are more than happy to partner with Amway, who, as part of its Corporate Social Responsibility strategy, works with UNICEF, the United Nations Children’s Fund. As a family company, Amway is committed to playing a part in improving the lives of children in need across the globe. In this way, the company is able to show its commitment to the support of global causes. Amway defines a global cause as ‘a social issue affecting many people around the world engaged in a struggle or plight that warrants a charitable  response’. This case study shows how Amway is a business that does more than provide customers with good quality products. It shows the practical realities of Amway’s global commitment and how it plays a key role in the communities in which it operates. Growth and responsibility An understanding of how Amway operates as an organisation gives a clearer picture of the contribution it can make to help children in need across the globe. Amway’s vision is to help people live better lives. It does this every day by providing a low-cost low-risk business opportunity based on selling qualityproducts. What does Amway do? Amway distributes a range of branded products. These products are sold to IBOs worldwide. The IBOs are Amway’s links with consumers and the communities in which they operate. The IBOs are self-employed and are highly motivated. They work within the guidelines of Amway’s Rules of Conduct and Code of Ethics, which are about being honest and responsible in trading. IBOs sell to people that they know or meet. They can introduce others to the Amway business. Typical products that IBOs sell include: personal care – fragrances, body care skin care and cosmetics durables such as cookware and water treatment systems nutrition and wellness products such as food supplements, food and drinks. IBOs play a key part in helping Amway to deliver its Global Cause Programme. In order to give many of the world’s children a chance to live a better life, Amway launched the global One by One campaign for children in 2003. The One by One programme: helps Amway to bring its vision to life declares what the company stands for builds trust and respect in Amway brands establishes Corporate Social Responsibility at a high level. Amway encourages staff and IBOs to support its One by One campaign for children. Since 2001, Amway Europe has been an official partner of UNICEF and has been able to contribute over â‚ ¬2 million (about  £1.4 million). The focus is on supporting  the worldwide ‘Immunisation Plus’ programme. This involves, for example, providing measles vaccines to children across the globe. The ‘Plus’ is about using the vehicle of immunisation to deliver other life-saving services for children. It is about making health systems stronger and promoting activities that help communities and families to improve child-care practices. For example the ‘Plus’ could include providing vitamin A supplements in countries where there is vitamin A deficiency. Since 2001, Amway and its IBOs across Europe have been supporting UNICEF’s child survival programme. The need is great. One out of ten children in Kenya does not live to see its fifth birthday, largely through preventable diseases. Malaria is the biggest killer with 93 deaths per day. Only 58% of children under two are fully immunised. The work of the One by One programme is illustrated by a field trip undertaken by Amway IBOs to Kenya. The IBOs travelled to Kilifi in 2006 to meet children and to find out what the problems are in various communities. They act as champions spreading the message throughout their groups. In Kilifi, the focus is on trying to reach the most vulnerable children and pregnant mothers. The aim is to increase immunisation from 40% to 70%. Other elements of the programme involve seeking to prevent the transmission of HIV/AIDS to infants. As the Amway organisation grows and prospers, it is able through CSR actions to help communities to grow and prosper too. Developing a strategy A strategy is an organisational plan. Implementing a strategy involves putting that plan into action. In other words a strategy shows how a business will achieve its goals. The strategy thus enables an organisation to turn its values into action. Values are what a company stands for. An important value for Amway is being a caring company. Amway believes in demonstrating this caring approach and this is why it has partnered with UNICEF. All Directors design strategies for the whole of an organisation. Effective strategies involve discussion and communication with others. The views of IBOs are influential in creating strategies for Amway. Amway’s strategies for corporate social responsibility are cascaded through the organisation as shown below. Amway’s Global Cause strategy involves creating responsible plans that make a difference. However, the strategy is flexible. In shaping the strategy, research was carried out to find out which global causes IBOs support. The results showed that many favoured a cause that helped children. There was a clear fit between Amway’s aims to help children and UNICEF’s ‘Immunisation Plus’ programme for children. Objectives From the outset, Amway set out some clear objectives for its strategy. These were to: build loyalty and pride among IBOs and employees enhance Amway’s reputation as a caring organisation  make a real difference to human lives. Child mortality is particularly high in developing countries because of infectious diseases. Many children could still be alive if they had been vaccinated. For under  £12 a child can be vaccinated against these diseases and has a fighting chance to reach adulthood. UNICEF’s world child ‘Immunisation Plus’ programme is a fitting focus for the activities of Amway UK and its IBOs. The UK initiative is part of a European-wide fundraising campaign for children. It recognises the importance of building good working relationships with UNICEF in each market in order to launch fundraising programmes through Amway’s IBOs and their customers. The objective is to raise â‚ ¬500,000 (about  £350,000) every year until 2010 across Amway Europe. In 2005 Amway UK’s partnership was deepened through becoming an official Corporate Partner of UNICEF UK. The Corporate Partnership is a closer longer-term relationship which benefits both partners. Working together the two parties raise money for UNICEF. Identifying stakeholders  Amway’s Corporate Social Responsibility strategy has been developed with the interests of the followingstakeholders in mind: Communicating the strategy  Good, clear communication is essential in making sure that the CSR strategy relates directly to the company business objectives. Communication also helps in putting the strategy into practice. A number of communications media are used: 1. Face-to-face communication: Regular meetings take place between UNICEF, Amway and its IBOs. Through meetings with UNICEF staff, Amway is able to discuss the vision and objectives. It then passes the message on by meeting with IBOs. In 2005 the two organisations arranged a joint briefing day for  IBO Leaders. They were able to hear firsthand experiences from UNICEF staff about their roles and UNICEF’s work as well as where the money goes. 2. Printed material: Amway produces a monthly magazine for all IBOs called Amagram. 3. Public relations materials are also important, particularly at launch events for the initiative (e.g. in Milton Keynes in 2006). 4. Email communication: Email is very important in the company – it plays a significant part in keeping IBOs up-to-date. 5. Online activities: There is a micro-site dedicated to the Amway UK/UNICEF partnership on the UNICEF UK website. Fundraising Amway Europe provides support for fundraising to the extent of â‚ ¬500,000 (about  £350,000) per year through selling items such as: greetings cards multi-cultural gifts and cards stationery and wrapping paper toys for children. However, Amway UK’s support goes well beyond these activities. In addition, it involves staff fundraising events and raffles organised by the IBOs. UNICEF attends IBO major events (usually supported by 1,000 or more IBOs) where requested. A UNICEF stand outlines the work with speakers, literature and merchandise. Conclusion Amway is a family business with family values. Its IBOs are people who want to make a difference to the communities in which they operate and to the wider world community. This is Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in action. The clue to Amway’s success is the careful planning of its strategy and its involvement with manystakeholders in getting the strategy right. Of course, it is early days in the latest chapter of a strong relationship between Amway and UNICEF. Evaluation is taking place to measure the success of the initiative in terms of meeting fundraising goals. Customer research is carried out to test customers‘ views on the relationship and to find out how aware the general public is about what Amway is doing in the field of CSR. Sample study questions 1. What do you understand by the term Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR)? 2. Explain two actions that Amway and its IBOs are currently taking that involve CSR. 3. Analyse the key ingredients in Amway’s CSR strategy. Show how the strategy is designed to translate the vision into practical steps on the ground. 4. Recommend ways in which Amway could enhance and develop its impact on making every child matter.

Thursday, October 10, 2019

How Does Caffeine Affect the Heart Rate of the Daphnia

My results and the graph indicate that as you add the caffeine to the daphnia, the eart rate of the daphnia increases for example the daphnia's heartbeat is 120 without caffeine, however when caffeine is added it is increased to 168. My graph shows a positive correlation and the error bars are also very small which shows that the results have a small range which suggests that my results are accurate and reliable. I think that the experiment was conducted well however there may be some ethical issues surrounding the fact that daphnias are also living species.Therefore, by using daphnias in these experiments may cause a risk for them as there would be little quantities of the species left. This would also affect other living organisms that feed on daphnias for their dietary needs therefore in the experiment we diluted the caffeine solution with distilled water to prevent the daphnia from dying and afterwards, we could put them back in their natural habitats. On the other hand, by doing this experiments it could potentially help us in the future.Also, another problem is that I may have miscounted the daphnias heartbeat due to human errors. However, as I repeated the experiment 3 times, it ensures me that the data is quite accurate. However, if I was to do the experiment again I would do more repeats to make sure the results are reliable and there would be less chance of human error. Also, I would use different concentrations of caffeine to get more accurate comparisons and to see how different concentrations may affect the daphnias heartbeat also. Overall, I think that my results are precise and distinct.

Dulce Et Decorum Est

In the two poems â€Å"Dulce et Decorum Est,† by Wilfred Owen and â€Å"The Death of the Ball Turret Gunner,† by Randall Jarrell, a common theme is expressed among the two. The expendability of life in warfare is that theme. Both poems express this theme in the same way and make readers realize the worth of life to our armed forces. In â€Å"The Death of the Ball Turret Gunner† this theme is shown through the eye of a man that had to experience death in a way that no other person would understand. The writer of the poem, Randall Jarrell recollects his time spend in the air force and his duties.Of which he had to clean out the ball turret of aircraft when they were soiled. This task is what Randall speaks of during his poem. The theme of expendability of life in warfare, can be placed on this task since what Randall was really doing was washing the turret of the human remains with a hose. This action was not something that only happened once; this was his duty, an action that was performed regularly. The cleaning and repair of the turret just meant that another body could be placed in the turret with no emotion or hesitation.In â€Å"Dulce et Decorum Est† the theme is also shown through the eyes of a man that had to experience death on a daily basis. The writer of the poem, Wilfred Owen describes an event that occurred during service. Wilfred’s description of is that of a fellow brother drowning in gas clouds and the action or lack of taken after his death. The theme that the two poems have in common comes into play when Wilfred recalls the event of other men throwing their brother’s body into a wagon and continuing forward like nothing had happened.This action too shows the worth of ones life in the armed forces and that a life can easily be replaced. The two poems, â€Å"The Death of a Ball Turret Gunner† and â€Å"Dulce et Decorum Est† are two works that demonstrate how fragile life is and that to some l ife can simply be replaced. The theme of the expendability of life in warfare can be placed on both of the poems since in both life is lost and replaced without reluctance. Even though the two poems were written in two different time periods they both convey the same theme, and do that so in a way that is some what understated but very direct in showing the expendability of life. Dulce Et Decorum Est â€Å"Anyone, who truly wants to go to war, has never really been there before† Kosovar. This not so famous quote, tells about how blind people were to the horrors and tribulations of war due to a force we call propaganda. â€Å"Dulce et Decorum est pro patria mori† is a controversial phrase used to describe the benefits of going to war. It has different translations but it basically states â€Å"it is sweet and fitting to die for one’s country†, this is just one of the many techniques a nation could use to shade the soldiers to the harsh reality of war. In this essay I will be evaluating two poems Dulce et Decorum est and The Charge of the Light Brigade. â€Å"Dulce et Decorum† est is a poem about war written by Wilfred Owen during World War 1 in 1917-1918. He was a soldier who experienced war first hand and wrote his poem with primary information. â€Å"The Charge of The Light Brigade† is also a poem about war that was written by Alfred Lord Tennyson, a poet Laureate during the 19th Century. Tennyson uses secondary information to write his poem. Both poems have a direct link to the quote but both have different perspectives of if it really is sweet and fitting to die for ones country. Within the evaluation of the poems I will be analysing Language, Form and Structure, Themes and Context for each poem and at the end I will sum up the main differences and similarities between the two poems. â€Å"Dulce et Decorum est† In the poem Wilfred Owen uses similes to portray the soldiers as weary, lesser beings that have aged prematurely. â€Å"Bent double, like old beggars under sacks, knock-kneed, coughing like hags. † The similes comparing the soldiers to â€Å"beggars† and â€Å"hags† already wipes away the thought of soldiers’ being young, strong, healthy, able bodied men. The words â€Å"knock-kneed† and â€Å"coughing† tells us that war is physically demeaning. Owen already starts to show the reality of war. This phrase also tells us about how young men could be transformed into old people. An alternative connotation may not mean that they were old physically but the phrase â€Å"old beggar† sounds like they have been scarred with the experience of seeing a comrade die, that is what has aged them. Owen tells the reader that the men haven’t taken a break from war making them exhausted. The following phrases suggest this: â€Å"And towards our distant rest began to trudge† Men marched asleep† â€Å"Drunk with fatigue† The first quotation literally tells us that the soldiers haven’t rested in a long time â€Å"Distant rest†. From another perspective distant rest may mean the soldiers are going towards inevitable death. The second â€Å"men marched asleep† are two words that contradict; marching is supposed to be full of energy and drive but modifying the meaning with the oxymoron makes it easier to understand how tired they were. Another connotation portrays the phrase as the man just doing an endless routine, in the sense that if you are used to something you could do it asleep. Although, â€Å"men marched asleep† could indicate self realisation. This suggestion comes on the basis of the title â€Å"Dulce et Decorum Est†, the initial phrase tells that the energy that was proclaimed about war was never there and that they are realising the truth. The third quotation â€Å"Drunk with fatigue† carries on emphasising the fact that they are tired. This has some depth because by saying the soldiers were â€Å"drunk† with it tells us that they have had to much as with alcohol that can make you drunk if you have had too much. Wilfred Owens use of rhyme depicts the atmosphere of war as slow and unenthusiastic. Sludge†, â€Å"Trudge† The rhyme creates a slow rhythm this may mean that Owen is trying to tell us that war is not energetic also the word â€Å"Trudge† suggests the slow pace of the soldiers, this slow pace is a key factor in creating the atmosphere of war. Owen shows the reader that war can be unpredictable and dangerous. â€Å"Gas! Gas! Quick, boys† The immediacy and urgency of the gas attack is presented through the repetition of the word â€Å"Gas! †. The capital letter on the phrase and the use of exclamation, making it easier to see that someone is shouting out. The sharp entry to the second stanza off the back of the slow start is a juxtaposition this emphasises wars unexpectancy. Wilfred Owen compares the gas to a green sea to stress the gasses danger. â€Å"As under a green sea, I saw him drowning† The poet likens the gas to green sea not only because of the colour but because in both atmospheres it is impossible to breath fluently. The poet continues to mock the title by telling us about the â€Å"drowning† which represents chaos of a gas attack. The last two lines of the 2nd stanza do not rhyme this could be because of the slowness of death that is experienced through death from a gas attack. Owen tells that there is a loss of identity during the chaos of war. â€Å"But someone still was yelling out and stumbling† The use of the word â€Å"someone† shows that during warfare you are note recognized by an identity and the word â€Å"yelling out† suggest chaos during the war. Another connotation may suggest that the soldiers were too scared to stick together as one and help each other. The third stanza is separated from the rest of the stanzas to show his initial reflection to the barbarity of war. â€Å"In all my dreams, before my helpless sight, he plunges at me guttering, choking, and drowning. The poet repeats the word â€Å"my† to exaggerate that it is his reflection of the nightmare of war. The couplet could easily be a thought aloud because the word â€Å"plunges† makes us feel the soldier’s desperation as well as the poet’s helplessness. My point is also exercised within the gerunds by continuing the gerunds it suggest that after everyone he still couldn’t do anything to help the soldier. Owen uses inclusive language to make the reader feel sympathy for soldiers blinded by war. â€Å"My friend, you would not tell with such high zest† The use of the words â€Å"My friend† and â€Å"you† already tells us that we are the audience of this quote. The phrase means that we will not talk about war/death enthusiastically because nothing good comes out of it. My point is also expressed somewhere else in the fourth stanza; the poet describes war as â€Å"obscene as cancer†. The incentive behind the poem at this point in time is to enlighten readers to the effects of propaganda on soldiers during World War 1. But during Owens time, this poem was a warning to any soldier or soldier to be, to not experience warfare. Owen also wrote this poem to mock the phrase â€Å"Dulce et Decorum est pro patria mori† he does this in many lines of his poem. I saved this phrase for last because it is the most influential is â€Å"Behind the wagon that i flung him in† This phrase is powerful because many of the translation tell us that â€Å"it is sweet and proper†Ã¢â‚¬ it is pleasing and beauteous†and â€Å"it is sweet and honourable†; as human beings there is no logic behind saying flinging a man behind a wagon is honourable. Gathering all of Owens firsthand experience of war his preparation of war is that it is a negative unethical way of settling dispute. He tells us about a countries way of tricking people in to wasting their life on a war that has triggered current wars today and many deaths today. The first line of the â€Å"Charge of Light Brigade† already starts to contradict with â€Å"Dulce et Decorum est†, it portrays energy by the use of repetition. â€Å"Half a league, half a league, half a league onward† This burst of energy at the start of the poem already shows an energetic war. The repetition of â€Å"half a league† represents horses galloping. This contradiction is overwhelming compared to â€Å"Dulce et Decorum est† start which was very stagnant. Tennyson’s perception of soldiers during war also continues to contradict with Owens views of soldiers being cowards. ‘Forward, the Light Brigade! Charge for the guns' The word â€Å"charge† shows drive and bravery because not every day in a war do you see or hear about soldiers running towards guns. Here the poet creates heroes in our minds blinding us to the true atmosphere of soldiers running towards active guns. The word â€Å"charge† contradicts with Owens portrayal of war because in his poem the movement of the soldiers was slow the word â€Å"Trudge† suggests this. The poet continuously shows the soldiers fearlessness by comparing the battleground to horrific scenes. â€Å"Into the valley of death† This phrase already tells us that death is inevitable and by delving into such an atmosphere, shows their courage. Another connotation may mean that the soldiers are showing an act of stupidity because as a reader you will not expect heroes to be walking stupidly into death. A comparison between both poems is the fact that the soldiers, when in the experience of war have no identity and are regarded as â€Å"someone†. Someone had blunder’d† The use of the word â€Å"someone† emphasises my point that the soldiers identity have been stripped from them, this more or less makes them equal to the soldiers portrayed in Owens poem. Another similarity could be the fact that war causes chaos, the word â€Å"blunder’d† suggests that within all the charging and riding the war still affects a soldier mentally makin g them call out unnecessarily. Tennyson uses repetition to tell the reader that the soldiers were acting as one big unit combining and contributing as the rode straight in to death. Theirs not to make reply, theirs not to reason why, theirs but to do and die† The repetition of the word â€Å"theirs†, tells us that they were collectively familiar with each other. It could also mean they were too disciplined and had no choice but to do what they were told. Again Tennyson uses repetition but this time the poet uses it to represent the soldier’s dangerous situation. â€Å"Cannon to right of them, Cannon to left of them, Cannon in front of them† The repetition of â€Å"cannon† tells us that the soldiers are surrounded and have nowhere to go but back, they continue march, this shows the soldiers bravery. Another connotation has a similarity to Owens poem; the soldiers being surrounded by cannons show their helplessness within war, this is the same way that Wilfred Owen felt during the gas attack in his poem. The connotation brands war as a phenomenon that renders soldiers helpless. Tennyson shows extreme professionalism in the soldiers during a time of peril. â€Å"Boldly they rode and well, into the jaws of Death, into the mouth of Hell† This tells us that amidst all the chaos and fighting they are still riding good even under the pressure they were under. By pressure i mean the fact they are riding into â€Å"mouth of hell† this phrase means that even at the door of death they were still knocked. The soldiers continue to be portrayed as gallant although their opponents have the upper hand. â€Å"Sabring the gunners there† The word â€Å"sabring† tells us that the soldiers are using swords also the word â€Å"gunners† tells the reader that the opposition have guns. Logic tells us that fighting with swords against guns is stupid but doing it in a war makes it seem great. An alternative interpretation to the phrase may be Biblical in the sense that David used a sling shot to defeat a well armoured Goliath. The poet not only shows the soldiers as strong physically but mentally too this is a complete contrast to the soldiers at the start of â€Å"Dulce et Decorum est† â€Å"Right thro’ the line they broke† Many soldiers will stop fighting right after seeing the guns they were facing but these bold soldiers kept of going and managed to penetrate through the opposing side’s front line the words â€Å"line they broke† suggests this. The soldiers in â€Å"Dulce et Decorum est† are immediately contrasted by saying â€Å"Bent double, like old beggars under sacks†. The poet glorifies the soldiers because against staggering odds they managed to return. â€Å"Back from the mouth of Hell† This suggests that they went to hell and came back, this is physically impossible but still they came out. The last stanza is similar to Owens last stanza because it is aimed at the reader When can their glory fade? The rhetorical question is in place so that it is aimed at the reader. The phrase basically means when can their glory ever be matched, ever be removed from an unseen plaque. The poet exaggerates their actions to attract a lot potential soldiers to enlist. All the world wondered This phrase is propaganda it was probably put in the poem to let soldiers now what type of fame they will get if they join the army. Alfred Lord Tennyson’s purpose of writing this poem was to glorify the war and also use enough techniques within his poem to persuade a soldier to go to war. I believe he succeeded because of the bravery shown by the soldiers that he creates and the reaction in the last paragraph. The two poems â€Å"Dulce et Decorum est† and â€Å"The Charge of the Light Brigade† are two poems that talk about war and propaganda infused into war. They are two controversial phrases that could be biased from both sides so we cannot say that one’s perception of war is right or wrong. But as for me I do not agree with the fictional book story â€Å"The Charge Of The Light Brigade† it sounds too unreal. Like I wrote in the beginning of my essay â€Å"Anyone, who truly wants to go to war, has never really been there before†, it is down to poets such as Wilfred Owen and Alfred Lord Tennyson to dictate a man’s perception of warfare. Dulce et Decorum Est â€Å"Dulce et Decorum est† is a poem written by Wilfred Owen the famous poet and solider, who fought and died in World War 1, who is considered one of the greatest war poets of his time. The Great War resulted in more than 40 million casualties; soldiers were originally volunteers but were increasingly conscripted into service. War poets such as Owen describe the intense horror of being a solider in the trenches. People who stayed home were blissfully unaware of the sufferings of the soldiers at the front line. They stayed in their safe homes swallowing the propaganda fed to them by the government, telling the younger generations stories of the honour and bravery of the battlefield. The poem â€Å"Dulce et Decorum† addresses the issue of propaganda and the horror suffered. The poem effectively delivers the messages â€Å"Don't lie to the public through propaganda† and â€Å"The War was the pointless killing of the innocent. † The first stanza of the poem is very significant in that it uses alliteration and meter that plunges the reader into the poem. This and the fact the first stanza is in first person causes the reader to feel as if he or she is experiencing war firsthand. Owen incorporates specific imagery to into the poem in order to introduce the reader to the chaotic world of war. Owen opens by saying that the soldiers are â€Å"bent double. † This statement manages to effectively convey the exhaustion of the soldiers, who have become so disillusioned that they find themselves in a state of purgatorial numbness. Moreover, Owen describes the soldiers as being like â€Å"old-beggars. This a peculiar term to use since most the soldiers were young men when they enlisted; Owen's reason for using this simile is to demonstrate the way war ages soldiers both physically and emotionally. He also compares the soldiers to â€Å"hags† a word that brings to mind disfigurement, and thus could act as a possible reference to the mutilation of bodies so often encountered in war. Additionally, Owen describes the soldiers as being â€Å"drunk with fatigue† which seems especially significant because of the suggestion of idea of inebriation as a form of escape from reality, the only method of escape available to them. The second Stanza of the poem signifies a major transitional point in the poem, breaking down the structure and snapping the reader into a sense of panic that is similar to the fear experienced on the battlefield. Owen opens the stanza with the words â€Å"Gas! GAS! † The capital letters are important because it sets a tone of urgency and panic and makes it seem as if the author is yelling at the reader, just as the soldiers and the superiors would probably be yelling frantically. Interestingly, Owen describes the soldiers experience as an â€Å"ecstasy of fumbling. The use of the word â€Å"ecstasy† to describe an undoubtedly horrific experience shows Owens recognition and disgust at the aesthticization of war and death commonly utilized by the government at the time. Owen uses words such as â€Å"clumsy†, â€Å"stumbling† and â€Å"flound'ring† to stress the immediacy and emergency of the state in which the soldiers find themselves. One gets the sense that most, if not all, choreographed instructions and drills of procedures for this kind of emergency are discarded and that the soldiers frantically improvise to do what they can to survive. Furthermore, the ellipsis in this stanza seems vital in the understanding the poem. This is because it represents the passage of time between the frantic fumbling for the gas masks and Owen's viewing of a man â€Å"drowning† in a â€Å"sea† of gas, struggling to survive, the use of â€Å"sea† and â€Å"drowning† conveys the image of the body thrashing as one would when drowning. The third stanza of the poem is the shortest, but in some ways, it is the most vivid. Owen describes how he sees this man â€Å"in all dreams†; this is characteristic of the ongoing trauma that so many soldiers experience not only during the war, but after the war as well. The narrator describes himself as experiencing this repeatedly, watching this man, yet remaining â€Å"helpless†. This illustrates Owen's frustration, and perhaps guilt, at his not being able to do anything to save this man. Owen goes on to say that the man â€Å"plunges at me†; the man knows he is going to die, because try as he might he is aware that there is nothing to be done. It is clear that Owen is haunted by this image based on his vivid description of the man as â€Å"guttering, choking and drowning. The man slow and futile struggle to survive continues to disturb Owen for long after the incident has passed. The fourth and final stanza of the poem marks the first time that Owen employs the second person, by using the word â€Å"you. † He directly addresses and actively draws the reader into the poem. He also continues with his use of descriptive imagery by describing the man as having â€Å"white eyes writhing in his face. † As the man leaves life and enters death his eyes once full of expression now carry numbness and desensitization. Owen goes on to say that the soldiers have â€Å"innocent tongues† to further portray the injustice of soldiers killed in battle and the governments' evil for allowing the war to continue. The last stanza, especially the ending, read as if it is a final plea to the reader. Owen says that if the reader were able to truly experience the horrors of fighting in battle, he or she would never promote or glorify war to the future generations. This plea represents a reworking of the title of the poem, which literally translates from Latin into â€Å"How sweet it is to die for your country. If when reading the poem the reader interprets the title literally, by the end of the poem it is clear that Owen uses the title as a tool for making an ironic statement instead. Throughout the poem the reader is shown vivid imagery describing war which can effectively fill one with anger, pity, sadness or even satisfaction that at least someone is speaking the truth. For me personally it makes me sad. â€Å"Dulce et Decorum est† is tragic. Owen speaking from first hand experience of a soldier sent to the front line, hurls pain in to the reader's face, causing the reader to feel both pity and guilt for the crimes of war. Dulce Et Decorum Est â€Å"Anyone, who truly wants to go to war, has never really been there before† Kosovar. This not so famous quote, tells about how blind people were to the horrors and tribulations of war due to a force we call propaganda. â€Å"Dulce et Decorum est pro patria mori† is a controversial phrase used to describe the benefits of going to war. It has different translations but it basically states â€Å"it is sweet and fitting to die for one’s country†, this is just one of the many techniques a nation could use to shade the soldiers to the harsh reality of war. In this essay I will be evaluating two poems Dulce et Decorum est and The Charge of the Light Brigade. â€Å"Dulce et Decorum† est is a poem about war written by Wilfred Owen during World War 1 in 1917-1918. He was a soldier who experienced war first hand and wrote his poem with primary information. â€Å"The Charge of The Light Brigade† is also a poem about war that was written by Alfred Lord Tennyson, a poet Laureate during the 19th Century. Tennyson uses secondary information to write his poem. Both poems have a direct link to the quote but both have different perspectives of if it really is sweet and fitting to die for ones country. Within the evaluation of the poems I will be analysing Language, Form and Structure, Themes and Context for each poem and at the end I will sum up the main differences and similarities between the two poems. â€Å"Dulce et Decorum est† In the poem Wilfred Owen uses similes to portray the soldiers as weary, lesser beings that have aged prematurely. â€Å"Bent double, like old beggars under sacks, knock-kneed, coughing like hags. † The similes comparing the soldiers to â€Å"beggars† and â€Å"hags† already wipes away the thought of soldiers’ being young, strong, healthy, able bodied men. The words â€Å"knock-kneed† and â€Å"coughing† tells us that war is physically demeaning. Owen already starts to show the reality of war. This phrase also tells us about how young men could be transformed into old people. An alternative connotation may not mean that they were old physically but the phrase â€Å"old beggar† sounds like they have been scarred with the experience of seeing a comrade die, that is what has aged them. Owen tells the reader that the men haven’t taken a break from war making them exhausted. The following phrases suggest this: â€Å"And towards our distant rest began to trudge† Men marched asleep† â€Å"Drunk with fatigue† The first quotation literally tells us that the soldiers haven’t rested in a long time â€Å"Distant rest†. From another perspective distant rest may mean the soldiers are going towards inevitable death. The second â€Å"men marched asleep† are two words that contradict; marching is supposed to be full of energy and drive but modifying the meaning with the oxymoron makes it easier to understand how tired they were. Another connotation portrays the phrase as the man just doing an endless routine, in the sense that if you are used to something you could do it asleep. Although, â€Å"men marched asleep† could indicate self realisation. This suggestion comes on the basis of the title â€Å"Dulce et Decorum Est†, the initial phrase tells that the energy that was proclaimed about war was never there and that they are realising the truth. The third quotation â€Å"Drunk with fatigue† carries on emphasising the fact that they are tired. This has some depth because by saying the soldiers were â€Å"drunk† with it tells us that they have had to much as with alcohol that can make you drunk if you have had too much. Wilfred Owens use of rhyme depicts the atmosphere of war as slow and unenthusiastic. Sludge†, â€Å"Trudge† The rhyme creates a slow rhythm this may mean that Owen is trying to tell us that war is not energetic also the word â€Å"Trudge† suggests the slow pace of the soldiers, this slow pace is a key factor in creating the atmosphere of war. Owen shows the reader that war can be unpredictable and dangerous. â€Å"Gas! Gas! Quick, boys† The immediacy and urgency of the gas attack is presented through the repetition of the word â€Å"Gas! †. The capital letter on the phrase and the use of exclamation, making it easier to see that someone is shouting out. The sharp entry to the second stanza off the back of the slow start is a juxtaposition this emphasises wars unexpectancy. Wilfred Owen compares the gas to a green sea to stress the gasses danger. â€Å"As under a green sea, I saw him drowning† The poet likens the gas to green sea not only because of the colour but because in both atmospheres it is impossible to breath fluently. The poet continues to mock the title by telling us about the â€Å"drowning† which represents chaos of a gas attack. The last two lines of the 2nd stanza do not rhyme this could be because of the slowness of death that is experienced through death from a gas attack. Owen tells that there is a loss of identity during the chaos of war. â€Å"But someone still was yelling out and stumbling† The use of the word â€Å"someone† shows that during warfare you are note recognized by an identity and the word â€Å"yelling out† suggest chaos during the war. Another connotation may suggest that the soldiers were too scared to stick together as one and help each other. The third stanza is separated from the rest of the stanzas to show his initial reflection to the barbarity of war. â€Å"In all my dreams, before my helpless sight, he plunges at me guttering, choking, and drowning. The poet repeats the word â€Å"my† to exaggerate that it is his reflection of the nightmare of war. The couplet could easily be a thought aloud because the word â€Å"plunges† makes us feel the soldier’s desperation as well as the poet’s helplessness. My point is also exercised within the gerunds by continuing the gerunds it suggest that after everyone he still couldn’t do anything to help the soldier. Owen uses inclusive language to make the reader feel sympathy for soldiers blinded by war. â€Å"My friend, you would not tell with such high zest† The use of the words â€Å"My friend† and â€Å"you† already tells us that we are the audience of this quote. The phrase means that we will not talk about war/death enthusiastically because nothing good comes out of it. My point is also expressed somewhere else in the fourth stanza; the poet describes war as â€Å"obscene as cancer†. The incentive behind the poem at this point in time is to enlighten readers to the effects of propaganda on soldiers during World War 1. But during Owens time, this poem was a warning to any soldier or soldier to be, to not experience warfare. Owen also wrote this poem to mock the phrase â€Å"Dulce et Decorum est pro patria mori† he does this in many lines of his poem. I saved this phrase for last because it is the most influential is â€Å"Behind the wagon that i flung him in† This phrase is powerful because many of the translation tell us that â€Å"it is sweet and proper†Ã¢â‚¬ it is pleasing and beauteous†and â€Å"it is sweet and honourable†; as human beings there is no logic behind saying flinging a man behind a wagon is honourable. Gathering all of Owens firsthand experience of war his preparation of war is that it is a negative unethical way of settling dispute. He tells us about a countries way of tricking people in to wasting their life on a war that has triggered current wars today and many deaths today. The first line of the â€Å"Charge of Light Brigade† already starts to contradict with â€Å"Dulce et Decorum est†, it portrays energy by the use of repetition. â€Å"Half a league, half a league, half a league onward† This burst of energy at the start of the poem already shows an energetic war. The repetition of â€Å"half a league† represents horses galloping. This contradiction is overwhelming compared to â€Å"Dulce et Decorum est† start which was very stagnant. Tennyson’s perception of soldiers during war also continues to contradict with Owens views of soldiers being cowards. ‘Forward, the Light Brigade! Charge for the guns' The word â€Å"charge† shows drive and bravery because not every day in a war do you see or hear about soldiers running towards guns. Here the poet creates heroes in our minds blinding us to the true atmosphere of soldiers running towards active guns. The word â€Å"charge† contradicts with Owens portrayal of war because in his poem the movement of the soldiers was slow the word â€Å"Trudge† suggests this. The poet continuously shows the soldiers fearlessness by comparing the battleground to horrific scenes. â€Å"Into the valley of death† This phrase already tells us that death is inevitable and by delving into such an atmosphere, shows their courage. Another connotation may mean that the soldiers are showing an act of stupidity because as a reader you will not expect heroes to be walking stupidly into death. A comparison between both poems is the fact that the soldiers, when in the experience of war have no identity and are regarded as â€Å"someone†. Someone had blunder’d† The use of the word â€Å"someone† emphasises my point that the soldiers identity have been stripped from them, this more or less makes them equal to the soldiers portrayed in Owens poem. Another similarity could be the fact that war causes chaos, the word â€Å"blunder’d† suggests that within all the charging and riding the war still affects a soldier mentally makin g them call out unnecessarily. Tennyson uses repetition to tell the reader that the soldiers were acting as one big unit combining and contributing as the rode straight in to death. Theirs not to make reply, theirs not to reason why, theirs but to do and die† The repetition of the word â€Å"theirs†, tells us that they were collectively familiar with each other. It could also mean they were too disciplined and had no choice but to do what they were told. Again Tennyson uses repetition but this time the poet uses it to represent the soldier’s dangerous situation. â€Å"Cannon to right of them, Cannon to left of them, Cannon in front of them† The repetition of â€Å"cannon† tells us that the soldiers are surrounded and have nowhere to go but back, they continue march, this shows the soldiers bravery. Another connotation has a similarity to Owens poem; the soldiers being surrounded by cannons show their helplessness within war, this is the same way that Wilfred Owen felt during the gas attack in his poem. The connotation brands war as a phenomenon that renders soldiers helpless. Tennyson shows extreme professionalism in the soldiers during a time of peril. â€Å"Boldly they rode and well, into the jaws of Death, into the mouth of Hell† This tells us that amidst all the chaos and fighting they are still riding good even under the pressure they were under. By pressure i mean the fact they are riding into â€Å"mouth of hell† this phrase means that even at the door of death they were still knocked. The soldiers continue to be portrayed as gallant although their opponents have the upper hand. â€Å"Sabring the gunners there† The word â€Å"sabring† tells us that the soldiers are using swords also the word â€Å"gunners† tells the reader that the opposition have guns. Logic tells us that fighting with swords against guns is stupid but doing it in a war makes it seem great. An alternative interpretation to the phrase may be Biblical in the sense that David used a sling shot to defeat a well armoured Goliath. The poet not only shows the soldiers as strong physically but mentally too this is a complete contrast to the soldiers at the start of â€Å"Dulce et Decorum est† â€Å"Right thro’ the line they broke† Many soldiers will stop fighting right after seeing the guns they were facing but these bold soldiers kept of going and managed to penetrate through the opposing side’s front line the words â€Å"line they broke† suggests this. The soldiers in â€Å"Dulce et Decorum est† are immediately contrasted by saying â€Å"Bent double, like old beggars under sacks†. The poet glorifies the soldiers because against staggering odds they managed to return. â€Å"Back from the mouth of Hell† This suggests that they went to hell and came back, this is physically impossible but still they came out. The last stanza is similar to Owens last stanza because it is aimed at the reader When can their glory fade? The rhetorical question is in place so that it is aimed at the reader. The phrase basically means when can their glory ever be matched, ever be removed from an unseen plaque. The poet exaggerates their actions to attract a lot potential soldiers to enlist. All the world wondered This phrase is propaganda it was probably put in the poem to let soldiers now what type of fame they will get if they join the army. Alfred Lord Tennyson’s purpose of writing this poem was to glorify the war and also use enough techniques within his poem to persuade a soldier to go to war. I believe he succeeded because of the bravery shown by the soldiers that he creates and the reaction in the last paragraph. The two poems â€Å"Dulce et Decorum est† and â€Å"The Charge of the Light Brigade† are two poems that talk about war and propaganda infused into war. They are two controversial phrases that could be biased from both sides so we cannot say that one’s perception of war is right or wrong. But as for me I do not agree with the fictional book story â€Å"The Charge Of The Light Brigade† it sounds too unreal. Like I wrote in the beginning of my essay â€Å"Anyone, who truly wants to go to war, has never really been there before†, it is down to poets such as Wilfred Owen and Alfred Lord Tennyson to dictate a man’s perception of warfare.